surgeries we perform

If your hip has been damaged by arthritis, a fracture, or other conditions, common activities such as walking or getting in and out of a chair may be painful and difficult. Your hip may be stiff, and it may be hard to put on your shoes and socks. You may even feel uncomfortable while resting.

In a total hip replacement (also called total hip arthroplasty), the damaged bone and cartilage is removed and replaced with prosthetic components. The damaged femoral head is removed and replaced with a metal (titanium) stem that is placed into the hollow center of the femur. The femoral stem may be either cemented or "press fit" into the bone. A metal or ceramic ball is placed on the upper part of the stem. This ball replaces the damaged femoral head that was removed. The damaged cartilage surface of the socket (acetabulum) is removed and replaced with a metal (titanium) socket.   A plastic (polyethylene) spacer is inserted between the new ball and the socket to allow for a smooth gliding surface.

 

You can expect to be able to return to all, or nearly all, activities you were able to do prior to your debilitating hip pain, including activities such as walking, biking, hiking, swimming, tennis, golf, and a whole host of others. Running marathons, sky diving, and bull riding on the other hand...Mmmm, you'll have to talk to me!

Arthroscopy is a procedure that we use, as Orthopedic surgeons, to inspect, diagnose, and repair problems inside a joint.The camera displays pictures on a television screen, and I use these images to guide miniature surgical instruments.Because the arthroscope and surgical instruments are thin, I can use very small incisions (cuts), rather than the larger incisions needed for standard, open surgery. This results in less pain for my patients, and shortens the time it takes to recover and return to your favorite activities.

 

Shoulder arthroscopy is done to treat problems such as rotator cuff impingement or tears, shoulder instability which usually requires repair of the labrum, A-C joint separation or arthritis, and biceps tendon ruptures, to name a few. The advent of shoulder arthroscopy to treat these conditions has been one of the truly great advances in the orthopedic field over the last several years. Though the recoveries still involve some degree of pain and discomfort and require time for healing of tissues and therapy to regain motion and strength, all of this has dramatically shortened the recuperation time and increased the performance level compared to the days of open surgeries.

Knee replacement, also called arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to resurface any damage caused by arthritis. Metal (titanium) and plastic (polyethylene) parts are used cap the end of the bones that form the knee joint, along with the patella. The surgery may be considered for someone who has severe arthritis from wear and tear over the years or perhaps from a previous knee injury.

 

After your Knee Surgery, we will have you up walking with a walker or crutches, and the assistance of a physical therapist the same day.  After a couple of days in the hospital you will be engaged in formal and aggressive physical therapy for the next several weeks and use an assistive device for walking for the next 3-6 weeks. The desired goal is for you to have alleviation of knee pain and increased range of motion and function


You can expect to be able to return to all, or nearly all, activities you were able to do prior to your debilitating knee pain, including activities such as walking, biking, hiking, swimming, tennis, golf, and a whole host of others. Cage Fighting, Base Jumping, and running with the bulls in Spain on the other hand...Mmmm, you'll have to talk to me!

     Knee Arthroscopy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures. In it, a miniature instrument called a "scope" is introduced into the knee joint through a small incision (portal). Attached to the scope is a handheld camera which provides a clear picture of the inside of your knee, viewed on a large TV screen. Through two or three very small portals, I am able to both see the internal structures of the knee and perform whatever procedure is necessary to correct the problem. The most common procedures include menisectomy (trimming or repairing a torn meniscus) and a reconstruction of a torn Ligament (ACL). Other procedures can also be done arthroscopically, such as debridement (smoothening) of arthritic cartilage or improving the tracking of a mal-tracking knee cap (patella). 

 

Athletes who participate in high demand sports like soccer, football, and basketball are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments. If you have injured your anterior cruciate ligament, you may require surgery to regain full function of your knee. This will depend on several factors, such as the severity of your injury and your activity level.

To surgically repair the ACL and restore knee stability, the ligament must be reconstructed. ACL reconstruction involves replacing the torn ACL with tissue taken from the patient (autograft) or taken from a tissue donor (allograft). This procedure is done arthroscopically and involves making tunnels in the femur and tibia allowing passage of the graft material in order to reconstruct the ACL.

 

Following knee arthroscopy for a meniscus tear, you should be able to return to all activities at full strength within a few weeks. Following ACL reconstruction surgery you should also be able to return to all activities at full strength but only after several months of rehabilitation and strengthening. Bracing may be required for pivot activities during the first year but optional after that.

 

 

 

Hip
Replacement

Shoulder
Arthroscopy

Knee
Replacement

Knee

Arthroscopy